‘Territorial’ group show

I am currently part of a group show titled ‘Territorial’ at The Banks Space gallery in Adalgate East, London E1, the gorgeous gallery that belongs to The Cass/ London Metropolitan University

This is an exhibition that I have curated, selecting and presenting my work and that of 5 other contemporary photographer as part of London Photomonth.

Territorial

The idea behind this show is to present work of contemporary photographic practicalness whose work is concerned with concepts human geography, identity and territory.

The show opened on 20th October with a well attended private view, and it will continue till 12th November. It’s open Wednesdays to Saturdays (shut sun-mon-tue).

There will also be 2 artist talks on 27th of October and 3rd November at 6pm, open to the public.

Working on this show whilst also preparing my solo show at The Stone Space gallery has been tough, especially due to the lack of funding – unfortunately funding for the arts in the UK seem to have miserably shrunk! To go around this issue, I printed everyone work with a white border and used it to pin the images to the wall, avoiding frames.

On the private view night the show was well received and I received positive feedback about both my work and my curation, of which I am very pleased.

I presented a selection of images of my series ‘Borderlands’ including some new images that I had never shown before, such as an image showing the Danube overflown (border Croatia-Serbia) and a portrait of an orthodox priest (photographed in Psarades, border Greece with Albania and Macedonia, last summer).

My work on show at The Bank Space

My work on show at The Bank Space

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Other artists included Ania Dabrowska, who showed a combination of 3 different series which includes both portraits as well archival images, collage and landscape as well as “passport books”. Her work deals with issues of identity, migration, belonging and homeland.

Ania Dabrowska ' work on show at the private view

Ania Dabrowska ‘ work on show at the private view

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Other artists include Yiannis Katsaris, presenting images of prayer boxes “EKissakia” on the roadside of Greece together with a new video piece composed of found family footage from the 80s, and Paul Greenleaf who is showing his work ‘Correspondence’. In this series Greeleaf has worked with found-postcards, rephotographing the location as it is today. The images are showcased with the original postcards, and the writings at the back of the postcards compose the titles. I approached Paul Greenleaf to take part in this exhibition as I found interesting his visual correlation between past and present, as well as how carefully he had curated the shots, matching the focal length used in the original postcards to that used in the new landscapes. He also exhibited 3 pieces of ambient music.

I also included 2 large scale images from the series ‘Sandlings’ by Alastair Bartlett, an ex student of mine at University of Suffolk.  His work is shot in 5×4 and beautifully presents landscapes of the Suffolk countryside which the photographer has selected based upon his childhood memory and personal attachment to that territory.

Alastair Bartlett series 'Sandlings'

Alastair Bartlett series ‘Sandlings’

Also part of the show is Christos Koukelis, an award winning photographer who has shown one of his first works titled ‘The Hill’. Photographed over a period of many months in 2000, this series focuses on a man made hill, constructed on top of a dried lake. It shows not only the passing of different seasons, but the human impact on the territory, as the vegetation has been burnt out and the lake dried up to make space for farmland and this hill. We don’t know the reason why it’s being built, but it’s awkwardly perfect symmetry stands out against the roughness of the natural landscape damaged by humans.

Christos Koukelis work 'The Hill'

Christos Koukelis work ‘The Hill’

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